Women’s Interest Network Makes Plans to End Violence

September 30, 2009  


A group of SMU students gather at the Women's Interest Network meeting Tuesday, Sept. 29 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center's Women's Center suite. The meeting was held to plan the 'Take Back the Night' event to help end violence against women. (PHOTO BY LAURA NOBLE/DAILY MUSTANG))

A group of SMU students gather at the Women's Interest Network meeting Tuesday, Sept. 29 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center's Women's Center suite. The meeting was held to plan the 'Take Back the Night' event to help end violence against women. (PHOTO BY LAURA NOBLE/DAILY MUSTANG))


By Jana Martin
jjmartin@smu.edu

More than a dozen SMU students and members of the Women’s Interest Network met in the Women’s Center to discuss plans for their upcoming event, Take Back the Night, which will be held on Nov. 3 in the Hughes-Trigg Theatre.

TBTN is an annual rally that has taken place in cities across the globe since the 1970s, according to the organization’s website. It is held in universities, battered women’s shelters, YMCA’s and other locations working to stop violence against women.

The organization seeks to promote awareness about sexual violence and support those who have been victims.

The National Institute of Justice reported, approximately 1.5 million women are raped or physically assaulted each year in the U.S. by an intimate partner. One in 4 women know domestic violence in her lifetime, according to Genesis Women’s Shelter in Dallas, and 1 in 3 teenage girls will be physically assaulted by a boyfriend.

Survivors of sexual violence will speak at the TBTN event. After sundown, a candlelight vigil will also take place. Maria Walker, WIN sponsor, said the event is a chance to educate out students and faculty about the sexual violence culture.

WIN, open to all men and women on campus, discusses issues concerning women. Weekly meetings are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. in the Women’s Center, located on the third floor of Hughes-Trigg.

“I came here tonight because my family was violent, we had lot’s of secrets,” Lindsey Gutierrez Ellison, an SMU freshman said. “Violence is like nuclear waste, you can’t see it, you can’t smell it, but eventually it starts to rot.”

WIN is sponsoring a “rape kit” donation drive and is collecting socks and toiletry items until Nov. 3. Collected items will be donated to the Victim Intervention Center at Parkland Hospital in Dallas. Donations are being accepted at the Women’s Center.

Enter Google AdSense Code Here

Comments

Comments are closed.