Multicultural Greek Council Teaches Students to Make Sushi

April 30, 2010 by · Comments Off 

SMU sophomores Karen Rico and Alberto Bruno make sushi at the Muticultural Greek Council\\\'s sushi-making class in the Varsity at the Hughes-Trigg Student Center on Thursday, April 29. (PHOTO BY KATIE SIMON/ SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

SMU sophomores Karen Rico and Alberto Bruno make sushi at the Muticultural Greek Council\\\'s sushi-making class in the Varsity at the Hughes-Trigg Student Center on Thursday, April 29. (PHOTO BY KATIE SIMON/ SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

By Katie Simon
katies@smu.edu

Something smelled fishy inside the Varsity in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center on Thursday night. And it was, in fact, raw fish.

SMU’s Multicultural Greek Council (MGC) held a sushi-making class as part of a series of events held by CelebrASIAN: Asian American Heritage Month celebration.

Members of both the Sigma Lambda Gamma sorority and the Omega Delta Phi fraternity teamed up with SMU’s Asian Council to put on the event with sushi ingredients provided by Mr. Sushi restaurant in North Dallas.

“Multicultural Greek Council likes to be involved with cultural activities—it’s one of our pillars,” said Jasmine Khaleel, an SMU junior and member of the Sigma Lambda Gamma sorority.

Khaleel said that their involvement with the sushi-making night was a contribution to the Asian Council.

The event was one of several social activities that the MGC puts on every semester, explained junior Ricardo Tovar, a member of the Omega Delta Phi fraternity.

“All of the greeks and non-greeks come out and just have a great time with us,” Tovar said.

While many of the students who showed up planned to celebrate Asian Heritage month, others were more interested in the free food.

“I’ve never tried sushi before,” Sigma Lambda Gamma freshman Ruby Sanchez said. “I figure this would be a good experience.”

The night began with live entertainment hosted by a Japanese drum band concert outside of Hughes-Trigg. Hungry students then made their way downstairs to find a completely transformed Varsity.

Tables were lined up with plates of cucumber, avocado, and seaweed. Pounds of raw tuna and lump crabmeat sat in tubs at the center of every table. A chef stood at each row of tables, sifting through the fish and preparing row after row of carefully handcrafted spicy tuna rolls.

Once the crowd of students had gathered in the Varsity, SMU senior and catering assistant Nick Reynolds carefully explained, step-by-step, the process of making the perfect California roll.

Each student was provided nori (roasted seaweed), a ball of rice, avocado slices, cucumber slivers, a lump of crabmeat, and a wooden roll-up mat to shape the sushi rolls.

Reynolds, who works at Mr. Sushi, explained that they were only making the sushi-making process seem easy.

“It is actually surprisingly easy to break sushi, especially the harder stuff,” he said. “It’s not just the one roll. When you do it, you do it over and over again and you have to make it perfect.”

While the perfect California roll may not have been achieved, the night ended with soy sauce spilled across the tables, sticky rice scattered across the floor, and new knowledge on how to make a sushi dinner for a group of closest friends who don’t judge the appearance of a roll.