Campus News Blog: Seasonal Flu Vaccine Now Available at the SMU Health Center

September 29, 2009 by · Comments Off 

Posted by Maria A. Prato

If you’re worried about getting the flu, don’t be. The seasonal flu vaccine is now available at the SMU Health Center

Health agencies strongly recommend everyone to get the seasonal flu vaccine as soon as possible. Seasonal flu is expected to occur between early October and late March.

The best way to prevent it is by getting the vaccination each flu season.

If you’re wondering about the vaccine for the H1N1 virus, the vaccine is currently in production and the SMU Health Center plans to have it available later this fall.

Cases of the H1N1 virus continue to be reported on campus. Bust most of them have been mild.

The H1N1 flu and the seasonal flu are different, and it is possible to catch both of them this season. If you had the seasonal flu vaccination before September 2009 you are not protected for the upcoming flu season.

If you’re interested in getting the seasonal flu vaccine it costs 25$

For more information and clinic’s schedulevisit the SMU flu website.

Student Health: Feel Fabulous with Fiber

August 31, 2009 by · 1 Comment 

By Marissa Adamany
madamany@smu.edu

The American Dietetic Association (ADA) recommends a minimum of 20-35 grams of fiber a day for a healthy adult. But why is fiber so important?

  • Fiber helps lower cholesterol and keeps the digestive system healthy.
  • High-fiber foods generally require more chewing time, giving your body time to register when you’re no longer hungry. This means you’re less likely to overeat, and you also stay full for a longer amount of time.
  • High-fiber diets tend to be less “energy dense,” meaning they have fewer calories for the same volume of food.
  • Fiber, particularly soluble fiber, can slow the absorption of sugar, which for people with diabetes can help improve blood sugar levels. A high-fiber diet may also reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
  • How can you get more fiber?

  • Focus on fruits and veggies– snack on apples, peaches, strawberries, carrots, broccoli, asparagus and eggplant.
  • Benefiber to-go packs – mix these easy, 30-calorie packets in water, juice, coffee, milk, and add 6 grams of fiber to your day.
  • Munchies – snack on sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds for an added fiber boost to keep you satisfied throughout the day.
  • Student Health: Feel Fabulous with Fiber

    April 27, 2009 by · Comments Off 

    By Marissa Adamany
    madamany@smu.edu

    The American Dietetic Association (ADA) recommends a minimum of 20-35 grams of fiber a day for a healthy adult. But why is fiber so important?

  • Fiber helps lower cholesterol and keeps the digestive system healthy.
  • High-fiber foods generally require more chewing time, giving your body time to register when you’re no longer hungry. This means you’re less likely to overeat, and you also stay full for a longer amount of time.
  • High-fiber diets tend to be less “energy dense,” meaning they have fewer calories for the same volume of food.
  • Fiber, particularly soluble fiber, can slow the absorption of sugar, which for people with diabetes can help improve blood sugar levels. A high-fiber diet may also reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
  • How can you get more fiber?

  • Focus on fruits and veggies– snack on apples, peaches, strawberries, carrots, broccoli, asparagus and eggplant.
  • Benefiber to-go packs – mix these easy, 30-calorie packets in water, juice, coffee, milk, and add 6 grams of fiber to your day.
  • Munchies – snack on sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds for an added fiber boost to keep you satisfied throughout the day.
  • Student Health: Workout at Home

    April 20, 2009 by · 1 Comment 

    By Marissa Adamany
    madamany@smu.edu

    No time to hit the gym? I understand–life gets crazy. There’s laundry to do, papers to write and parties to get ready for. But that doesn’t excuse you from exercising. I’ve got just the quick workout for you, and you don’t even have to leave your room.

    Do three set of the exercises listed below. Work up to 20 reps of each exercise. Do these everyday you can’t get to the gym, and you’ll have your friends asking, “Dang, who’s your trainer?”

  • Triceps dips- Sit on a bench or chair with hands resting next to thighs. Push up and bring the hips out, rear just brushing the bench, knees bent. Bend the elbows and lower body down (staying close to bench) until elbows are 90 degrees. Push up and repeat. Straighten the legs for more intensity.
  • Triceps one-armed pushup- Lie down on left side, hips and knees stacked. Wrap the left arm around torso so that left hand is resting on the right waist. Place the right hand on the floor in front of you, palm parallel to the body. Squeeze the triceps and push your body up. Lower and repeat before switching sides.
  • Squats on tiptoes- With feet wider than hips, squat down and place hands on phone book in front of you. Raise up on the tips of your toes. Staying on tiptoes and fingertips, lift hips up towards the ceiling and straighten the knees as much as you can. Squat back down and repeat, staying in tiptoes the entire time. Modify by placing hands higher (on a chair or bed).
  • Lunge with arms overhead- Stand in split stance with feet about three feet apart. Hold phone book or weight straight up overhead. Bend the knees and lower into a lunge, bringing both knees to 90 degree angles, front knee behind toe. Keeping weight overhead, push back up and repeat before switching legs.
  • Student Health: Stressed Out?

    April 13, 2009 by · Comments Off 

    By Marissa Adamany
    madamany@smu.edu

    With the three-day weekend over, it’s time for another week of tests and quizzes. Oh, and finals are right around the corner. Stressed out, yet?

    Stress causes our bodies to produce a hormone called cortisol. This hormone contributes to gaining weight, especially in the midsection. Stress also hinders willpower, making it near impossible to say “no” to that third fudge brownie.

    Chronic stress makes you more vulnerable to disease, and increases your heart rate and blood pressure, causing an increased risk for heart disease. Stress also increases glucose levels, putting the body at a higher risk for diabetes.

    But don’t let that all stress you out even more. Here’s what you can do to calm down and take control:

  • Go for a walk – A ten-minute walk around the beautiful boulevard will reduce stress, calm you mind, and clear your head. The fresh air does a body good.
  • Hang out with friends – Chilling with friends is a great opportunity to vent, share your favorite FML passage, or completely clear your mind of the work you have ahead. Sometimes, it’s ok to take a break.
  • Get cute – Studies show that when you feel you look good, you actually produce more serotonin in your brain, which is the “happy chemical.” Producing more serotonin will relieve negative stress.
  • Dance – Take it from Lady GaGa and… “Just dance, it will be ok, dududu Just Dance!” Enough said.
  • Look at pictures – Concentrate on a happy picture for ten seconds to reduce muscle tension and stabilize the heartbeat.
  • Take a deep breath – It sounds too easy, I know. But taking deep breaths helps slow your racing mind when you are stressed, allowing you to focus on the task at hand.
  • Say to yourself, “It will all be ok!” – Keeping a positive spin on things will help motivate you to get the job done, with spirits high.
  • Look at the big picture – In five years is this history term paper really going to determine your life’s work and meaning? Stay with me here–the answer is “no.” Do your best, but remember, your best is all you can do.
  • Still wigging out? The following foods have been shown to help lift your mood. All these foods have a high content of B vitamins that stimulate the brain’s production of that happy chemical, serotonin.

  • almonds
  • yogurt
  • pistachios
  • salmon
  • scallops
  • shrimp
  • walnuts
  • Student Health: Chinese Food the Smart Way

    February 3, 2009 by · 1 Comment 

    By Marissa Adamany
    madamany@smu.edu

    We all know that our favorite Chinese restaurants on Greenville like Betty’s Best and New Big Wong deliver until 3 o’clock in the morning. What you may not know is how to make that midnight splurge a little less hazardous to your waistline. Here’s my advice…

    First off, start with soup. Soup is a great way to fill you up with minimal calories. Choose hot and sour, wonton, or egg drop soup. One cup is about 50 to 70 calories. My best advice would be to stay away from the egg rolls, but if you just can’t help yourself, eat half of the shell and all of the stuffing. This saves about 70 calories.

    Next, order an entrée that is not fried. Instead of crispy chicken, opt for cashew chicken or sesame chicken. The fried batter in crispy chicken can add over 400 calories! And for those of you keeping track, that’s the equivalent to 45 minutes on the treadmill or elliptical…talk about torture. If its beef you like, order beef with broccoli or Mongolian beef.

    Also, spice it up for an added metabolism burn. Spicy foods like red pepper and cayenne actually briefly speed up your metabolism, helping you burn more calories. Most importantly, and I cannot emphasize this enough, skip the rice! White rice is just empty calories. It has no nutrients, it’s processed and has no fiber. The rice is what causes the food coma…and that gross feeling you experience when you have eaten too much. Additionally, it is much easier for your body to digest proteins (like chicken and beef) when there is no starch (like rice) in your body.

    Craving some other little calorie saver tricks?

    · Order food with no MSG – don’t ask, its just bad

    · Order food with light oil and light sauce (or sauce on the side)– major calorie saver

    · Skip out on all sweet and sour dishes. A combination of sugar, salt, and fried batter…trust me, you will hate yourself in the morning

    · Eat with chopsticks. It will help you eat slower and drain some of that excess sauce (extra sauce equals extra calories)

    · Take food out of the container and put in onto a plate. This helps drain out excess sauce.

    · Go ahead and eat a fortune cookie. One has only 30 calories. There’s no better way to end the night than with a little sweet treat!

    Marissa is a sophomore double major in Marketing and Corporate Communications & Public Affairs. She is also a personal trainer at the Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports. This semester, she will be writing a weekly health column for the Daily Mustang.