ABS Voices Past, Future Concerns About Being Black on the Hilltop

February 22, 2011 by · 1 Comment 

By E’Lyn Taylor
ejtaylor@smu.edu

Focusing on SMU’s past, present and future, the Association of Black Students (ABS) hosted “The Black Community at SMU Forum” in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Monday night.

Special guests included, Anthony Tillman, assistant provost for strategic initiatives and director of student retention and Stephany Coleman, assistant director of operation in the bursar’s office.

Students and faculty were able to voice their memories on blacks overcoming adversity at SMU during the late 1960s and ways they can make incoming minorities feel welcome.

The Association of Black Students (ABS) came together Monday night to voice their opinions about minority issues and milestones at SMU. ABS is hosting an array of events in dedication of Black History Month in February. (PHOTO BY E'LYN TAYLOR/ SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

ABS officials started the forum off with newspaper clips at each table that focused on various historical events including the 13 demands from the Black League of Afro-Americans in 1969 and SMU All-American Jerry Levias. Levias was the first African -American scholarship athlete, all which brought SMU minorities together.

Students were astounded when hearing there were only 301 African-American students at SMU and voiced concerns about the minimum recruitment in schools heavily populated with African-Americans. Students also had their opinions on why the numbers are so low.

Four reasons why students think black enrollment is low:

1. Price
2. Private School
3. Placement
4. More black students want to go to a HBCU

SMU freshman and international studies major Alex Nunnery said she was surprised at some of the African-American statistics at SMU but found the forum very informational.

“It’s really good talking about issues affecting our community,” Nunnery said.

The number one reason, the price of tuition at SMU, was at the forefront of the forum. Tillman encouraged students to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA) quickly since there will be major grand and loan cuts in the 2011-2012 school year. Tillman also urged students to get their higher education and take full advantage of the aid that is provided.

“If you have to pay for graduate school, something is wrong,” Tillman said. “If you take care of business during your undergrad you won’t have to worry about tuition cost. Four years you won’t have to worry about.”

ABS vice president, Fredrick Leach, says ABS’s main objective is to help incoming students with their first year process and “not leaving anything unsaid.”

MSWAT, a SMU faculty organization, is teaming up later this week for a private meeting discussing minority issues around the SMU campus.

The Big Chill at Dedman

August 23, 2010 by · Comments Off 

Posted By Stephanie Collins
spcollins@smu.edu

The Association of Black Students is hosting The Big Chill tonight in Dedman Rec Center from 8 to 10 p.m. The annual event is free and will have food, music, and drinks for all students.

For more information contact Courtney Kelly at clkelly@smu.edu.

African-American Alumni Give Back

April 22, 2010 by · Comments Off 

E’Lyn Taylor
ejtaylor@smu.edu

The SMU African American Alumni Association, now known as Quad A, hosted a Developing Dynamic Leaders reception Tuesday night at the SMU Faculty Club.

Eric Moyé, ’76, presiding judge of14th Civil District Court of Texas spoke at the event. The reception focused on encouraging mentor relationships between alumni and current SMU students as well as getting more African-American alumni involved in the organization.

The AAAA started in 1996 when graduating seniors said they wanted to have an alumni group. Alumna and past chair, Tracy Ware, said seniors petitioned and protested during the spring. A faculty member found out about the protest and offered to help them start the group.

The AAAA strives to bring awareness to their organization. Currently, there are 40 active alumni members and 40 mentees. With Quad A being fairly new, the alumni plans on developing a stronger relationship with the Association of Black Students and increase membership of the organization.

“What we are here to do today is to recognize participants and make this a networking opportunity for alumni,” said African-American alumni chair Vincent Battles. “If we can position ourselves in such a way to where people can realize there is a need for me to get involved, this is one of those opportunities.”

Battles presented four goals for Quad A:

  1. Continue with Developing Dynamic Leaders.
  2. Get more involved with the community.
  3. Host a speaker series that features prominent African American’s that have made a difference in society.
  4. Host more networking engagements.

ABS president Ne’andre Broussard said that this movement has made ABS a better organization.

“You start with a C and move up,” Broussard said.  “A lot of the students have moved up a grade and leader wise.”

Moyé encouraged alumni members to give service to Quad 4.

“You don’t have to give away a million dollars to be of service. Start by serving some other individual,” Moyé said.

He elaborated on the importance of involvement with Quad 4 and how the experience will be life changing not only to the alumni, but the person they mentor.

Moyé ended saying, “If you use your blessings in service, nobody knows where your path may ripple.”

Belinda Burks, an SMU alumna who serves on the alumni board, said, “I enjoyed the speaker very much. You can show true compassion and move on with life by serving others.”

Burks expects to give continuous support to the organization and help to get other alumni involved.

Lyndsey Hill, assistant director of Alumni Outreach, said that she was very pleased with the response and outcome of the reception.

“I was really interested in how much ABS and Quad A had accomplished this year, and I think them partnering more on things is great as well,” Hill said. “The new mentoring program is a new way of reaching out and partnering with the students. Quad A always did a good job reaching out and partnering with students, but this is just a new way of doing it.”

Black Heritage Fest Celebrates Student Talent

February 16, 2010 by · Comments Off 

By The SMU Daily Mustang Staff

Contributing Photographer Jefferson Johnson was at the Black Heritage Fest Monday night.
The Black Heritage Fest is one of many events planned throughout Black History Month.

Sophomore Christopher Edwards led the audience in a prayer and the song "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

Sophomore Christopher Edwards led the audience in a prayer and the song "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

Freshman Isake Slaughter performed an original poem titled "My Soul Cries." The poem was inspired by the tragedies in Haiti. (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

Freshman Isake Slaughter performed an original poem titled "My Soul Cries." The poem was inspired by the tragedies in Haiti. (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

Freshman Kyndra Mack performed RuNette Nia Ebo's poem "Lord, Why Did You Make Me Black?" (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

Freshman Kyndra Mack performed RuNette Nia Ebo's poem 'Lord, Why Did You Make Me Black?' (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

NeAndre Broussard and Association of Black Students Vice-President Courtney Kelly closed out the evening. Broussard said, “Black history is not just for us to understand, but for the world to understand because it is a part of the history.” (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

NeAndre Broussard and Association of Black Students Vice-President Courtney Kelly closed out the evening. Broussard said, “Black history is not just for us to understand, but for the world to understand because it is a part of the history.” (JEFFERSON JOHNSON/THE SMU DAILY MUSTANG)

Students ‘Give Thanks’ at ABS Dinner

November 24, 2008 by · Comments Off 

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